CUFA 2019

For details on the 2019 CUFA Conference, please see https://cufa2019.blogspot.com/

Call for Proposals

The College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) invites proposals for its Annual Conference, held in Austin, Texas on November 20-22, 2019. This year’s conference theme, Informed Action: Agency, Advocacy, Activism, offers CUFA and NCSS attendees an opportunity to more intentionally bridge research-driven theory and classroom practice.

In 2018, CUFA program chair Christopher Busey urged conference attendees to expand the intellectual contours of social studies education in troubling times. Yet, as David Stovall reminded us in his 2018 keynote, “America is proving itself to be what it has always been; there is nothing new about this moment.” The United States of America remains far from a perfect union; as a society, we neglect direct attention to the past and present implications of settler colonialism and neoliberalism while contemporary discrimination, racism, xenophobia, and violence continue to disproportionately affect marginalized communities, including but not limited to Indigenous and transgender women, women of color, Black men, religious minorities, and children and families in search of refuge and asylum. As scholars of social studies education, we often focus on how our research might inform curriculum and practices that impact current and future students and teachers, as well as the communities in which those students and teachers exist. However, our actions as researchers must also be informed by the communities with whom we have the privilege of working; how might we become better listeners and learners ourselves?

CUFA encourages proposals that advance knowledge and understanding of a wide range of issues pertaining to social studies education, with a common vision of moving the field forward through the theme of Informed Action. We welcome proposals from educators, faculty, scholars, and students who work in P-12 schools, teacher preparation, higher education, and non-traditional P-16 educational settings; those who work within and across such disciplines as ethnic studies, Indigenous studies, literacy, public policy, economics, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, queer studies, religious studies, and sociology; and community activists, organizers, artists, and others who engage social studies to inform policy and practice, and who in turn inspire the possibilities of social studies research and education.

In this effort, we draw from the critical, anti-racist, anti-oppressive, intersectional, settler colonial, and transnational foci centered in recent CUFA calls for proposals as we envision CUFA 2019 as a space that takes up such themes as an integral part of social studies education in theory, research, and practice. In particular, we urge our membership to consider the following four subthemes in preparation of submissions for CUFA 2019:

Democracy for Whom?

These institutions workin’ The devil prove he lurkin’ (Ruby Ibarra)

The preparation of active, participatory citizens in a democracy has long been held as the primary purpose of public schooling and is commonly used to position social studies education as vital for school and civic life. However, the history of education in the United States is a long history of injustice and inequity, from Native boarding schools designed to “kill the Indian,” to Black, Chinese, and Mexican public schools that served to systematically dismantle the cultural and linguistic practices and traditions of nonwhite communities, to the recent shutdown of dozens of majority-Black public schools in Chicago’s South Side. Thus, as Choctaw and Cherokee scholar Frances Rains explains, “The dilemma is how to teach about ‘core values’ such as ‘freedom,’ ‘liberty,’ and ‘justice for all’ in a country that has a continuing legacy of oppression and intimidation within its own boundaries.” In 2017, keynote panelist Kevin Kumashiro urged CUFA attendees to consider how the educational system is doing exactly what it was designed to do. If we as social studies educators and scholars are indeed devoted to democracy, our informed action must attend to disrupting the status quo. Proposals for this subtheme should center the role of democracy in the social studies and public schooling and might consider the following questions:

  • If a more perfect union requires, as the Preamble to the Constitution claims, the establishment of justice, what might democratic education truly look like in educational spaces? If the current systems must change, in which direction must they bend and how must they begin the work of transformation for the benefit of society?
  • How can social studies scholars better acknowledge the increasingly traumatic and precarious experiences faced by individuals and communities who exist on the margins of mainstream society in our current political atmosphere? How can intersectionality and other frameworks help researchers better articulate the different forms of oppression that exist in our democracy?
  • How can we foster more democratic discourse in a time when beliefs are often valued over facts?
  • How can we decenter whiteness and other societal norms that permeate educational spaces, from early childhood to post-secondary? What theoretical approaches might

provide lenses through which we can highlight perspectives and experiences that have historically marginalized? * What is the role of both curriculum and instruction in either exacerbating historical and contemporary trauma or acknowledging and disrupting such traumas?

Citizenship & Civics

Until women can get equal pay for equal work This is not my America
Until same gender loving people can be who they are This is not my America
Until black people can come home from a police stop Without being shot in the head
This is not my America
Until poor whites can get a shot at being successful This is not my America
(Janelle Monáe)

The definition and conceptualization of citizenship, in a multitude of forms and identities, continues to preoccupy many social studies educators and researchers. Yet, in many P-12 classroom contexts, citizenship is frequently reduced to notions of rule-following and contributing in discrete, individual ways to one’s community. As 2016 keynote speaker Bettina Love reminded us, we “don’t need to be a good citizen to have rights.” Proposals for this subtheme should center citizenship and civics and might consider the following questions:

  • As a field centered in civic action, how can scholars and educators address the limitations of traditional citizenship education and the longstanding exclusion of communities of color from the civic process? Moreover, how might the curriculum be reframed to describe the ways disenfranchised groups have demonstrated civic engagement within their own communities despite such exclusion?
  • How might social studies disciplines such as economics, geography, and sociology be more explicitly tied to civic engagement and citizenship?
  • What is the role of social movements in citizenship education? What opportunities do students have to participate in social movements in and out of the classroom? How might notions of dissent and resistance be framed in contrast to, or instead of, civic action?
  • How might social studies educators learn from community organizers, activists, and artists to provide students with an array of opportunities for civic engagement? How might scholarly definitions of civic action expand to include the work of community organizers, activists, and artists?

Challenges & Possibilities in Teacher Education

Teacher, my hands up Please, don’t make me a victim Teachers, stand up You need to tell us how to flip this system (The Coup)

Many CUFA attendees work directly with future social studies educators in a range of teacher preparation programs, often with sparse required methods coursework. In teacher preparation programs, teacher candidates may struggle with content knowledge and may never observe the classroom teaching of a social studies lesson as the presence of social studies in early grades continues to diminish. In the face of such daunting realities, CUFA is a unique space for social studies teacher educators to confront the shared challenges they face in preparing the next generation of social studies teachers, and to explore the possibilities of this important work. In 2017, keynote panelist Wayne Au asserted that “our kids want to see themselves as potent justice warriors.” The same could be said for teacher candidates and teacher educators determined to use schooling spaces as venues for transformation toward liberty and justice for all. Proposals for this theme should specifically attend to the task of preparing future social studies teachers and might consider the following questions:

  • How can social studies researchers and educators be more intentional in their work to promote and implement critical media literacy in the fake news era? How can we prepare future social studies educators and researchers to do this work in a polarized, post-truth society?
  • How might teacher educators support future teachers to think differently about their power in the classroom and to prepare students for the world they need, rather than the world in which they currently exist? What are the curricular implications for such a vision?
  • Where are youth learning about and engaging with social issues outside of traditional school settings? How can P-12 educators and teacher educators learn from these spaces?

Informed Action beyond the Ivory Tower

In the back of the schoolbus I was reading my history But it didn’t say nothing About the kid sitting next to me (Amy Ray)

In 2016, CUFA keynote Tyrone Howard demanded that scholars draw the line from theory to practice. A year later, keynote panelist Kevin Kumashiro reminded social justice scholars to walk the walk, not just talk the talk and publish articles. In 2018, keynote David Stovall distinguished between those who are “merely theorizing and who is doing the work,” framing this as a critical moment in which each of us must decide if we will retreat or engage. Each of these keynotes from the last three years of CUFA conferences pointed to a common criticism of academics: that educational researchers are isolated in the world of academia, far removed from the realities of contemporary classrooms and schools. How might researchers take informed action in ways that might more directly engage with communities and classrooms? Proposals addressing this subtheme should attend to informed action beyond the ivory tower and might consider the following questions:

  • How can researchers attend to current crises, from local issues such as the gentrification that has transformed our 2019 conference site of Austin, TX and the water crisis in Flint, MI, to broader issues at a national and global scale, including voter disenfranchisement and suppression and waves of migrants seeking asylum?
  • What might researchers learn from the teachers and community members who are already responding to these crises and who are protecting and advocating for students and families? How might scholars connect to and support the work of P-12 classroom teachers and those who live in communities most affected by such crises?
  • How might scholars better serve those individuals and communities who are often subjects of study, but who rarely benefit from researchers’ scholarship and resources? How might scholars show greater accountability for distributing their work in the public sphere? What skills do researchers need to make these shifts, and how might schools and colleges of education serve as spaces that foster such skills?
  • How might social studies researchers reframe their epistemological, theoretical and methodological approaches to de-center imperialism, colonialism, and elitism and to actively dismantle white supremacy and cisheteropatriarchy?

Proposal Submission Overview

This year’s program will include individual papers, roundtables, symposia, contemporary issues dialogues (CIDs), collaborative initiative sessions (CISs), and research-into-practice (RIP) sessions. We will also have featured speakers, pre-conference workshops on Wednesday, November 20, and unconference spaces throughout the conference.

As the number of submissions to CUFA has increased in recent years, we are implementing three new changes to this year’s program. First, in order to ensure a range of presenters and diverse voices across the CUFA program, we are limiting individuals to three accepted presentations. Individuals may submit multiple paper, symposia, and other proposals; however, those who have more than three accepted proposals will be notified and asked to determine which three proposals they wish to present by June 1. Second, similar to the submission process for NCSS, proposals must indicate one of the CUFA conference subthemes with which the submission most closely aligns: Democracy for Whom?; Citizenship & Civics; Challenges & Possibilities in Teacher Education; Informed Action Beyond the Ivory Tower. The subtheme options and selection are embedded into the 2019 proposal form. Third, we are adding featured book sessions to allow authors of forthcoming books and edited volumes to promote their work more strategically. In recognition of the large number of presentations tied directly to recent and forthcoming publications within the field of social studies education in the last several years, we encourage individuals who have publications in forthcoming books and edited volumes to consider presenting in these sessions through a self-designed format that best serves their needs.

Descriptions for book session proposals are listed below.

Proposal Format & Instructions

To preserve the integrity of the blind peer review process, please do not include the names or affiliations of authors and presenters in the proposal document. The Program Chair reserves the right to disqualify submissions in which authors’ identifying information is revealed. In addition to completing the online proposal submission form, presenters must provide a PDF or Microsoft Word-compatible document that adheres to the guidelines described below. All submissions should be blinded for review. File upload limit through this form is 30MB. If accepted, final papers should be limited to 8,000 words, including references, and are due to discussants by October 28, 2019.

Individual Papers

Individual papers will be presented in both traditional paper presentation and roundtable formats, which are comprised of several independently proposed papers that allow authors to present abbreviated versions of their empirical, theoretical, or conceptual scholarship.

Each proposal should include the following elements:

  • a) the title;
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form;
  • c) the purposes and/or objectives of the study;
  • d) the theoretical framework or perspective;
  • e) research design and/or methods of inquiry;
  • f) findings or arguments and their warrants;
  • g) the importance of the work’s contribution to scholarship; and
  • h) references. Theoretical, conceptual, or methodological papers should include information equivalent to research design or methodology.

To preserve the integrity of the blind peer review process, please do not include the names or affiliations of authors and presenters in the proposal document. Paper proposals should not exceed 2,000 words, excluding the references and abstract.

Symposium

A symposium is a fully planned session involving multiple presentations or participants (no more than six), a chair, and a discussant. Symposium proposals should include:

  • a) the symposium title
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form
  • c) an overall symposium summary of 500 words or fewer without any author/participant identification addressing the following session elements: 1) objectives of the session, overview of the presentation, 2) scholarly or scientific significance and 3) structure of the session.

In addition to the required elements of the symposium proposal, each presenter/participant should include the following:

  • d) a title of 15 words or fewer for each presenter/participant in the symposium that is different from the overall symposium title e) a summary of 500 words or fewer for each presenter/participant in the symposium. Each paper/presentation summary in the symposium must address and will be reviewed on the following six elements:
    • 1) Objectives or purposes;
    • 2) Perspective(s) or theoretical framework;
    • 3) Methods, techniques, or modes of inquiry;
    • 4) Data sources, evidence, objects, or materials;
    • 5) Results and/or substantiated conclusions or warrants for arguments/point of view;
    • 6) Scientific or scholarly significance of the study or work. It is understood that theoretical, conceptual, or methodological papers will include information that is the equivalent of element 4 for those genres of scholarly work.
  • e) Symposium submissions should include chairs and, preferably, discussants, with appropriate expertise. One consolidated document should be provided for the proposal. Symposia proposals should not exceed a total of 3,500 words, excluding the references and abstract.

Research into Practice (RIP)

RIP sessions offer CUFA members the opportunity to discuss and demonstrate the implications of research for educational practice and are a part of the regular NCSS Conference program.

Audience members are typically classroom teachers, teacher educators, and school supervisors and administrators. Therefore presentations should feature scholarly, yet accessible, discussions and activities of interest to practicing educators. NCSS has allocated six one-hour RIP sessions on Friday, November 22.

RIP proposals should include the following elements:

  • a) the title;
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form;
  • c) the purposes and objectives of the session;
  • d) theory and research in which the session is grounded;
  • e) methods of presentation or modes of activity for the session;
  • f) findings or arguments and their warrants; and
  • g) references. Proposals should not exceed 2,000 words, excluding the references and abstract.

Contemporary Issues Dialogue

The contemporary issues dialogue format offers conference attendees an opportunity to explore contemporary issues or dilemmas in social education via a unique forum not represented by paper sessions and symposiums. Contemporary issues dialogues can include informal discussions, town hall meetings, structured poster sessions, off-site visits, video presentations and performances, and book talks.

Sessions that promote active participation and open dialogue among audience members are strongly encouraged. Proposal authors will determine how time is to be allocated during contemporary issues dialogues. Contemporary Issues Dialogue proposals should include the following elements, as appropriate:

  • a) the title;
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form;
  • c) the purposes and objectives of the session;
  • d) theory and research in which the session is grounded;
  • e) methods of presentation or modes of activity for the session;
  • f) findings or arguments and their warrants; and
  • g) references. Proposals should not exceed 2,000 words, excluding the references and abstract.

Collaborative Initiative Session

Collaborative initiative sessions highlight how educators across various levels (P-12, teacher education, higher education, public settings, and activist and non-profit organizations) come together to foster civic and citizenship education learning experiences for students, families, and community members in formal and informal educational settings. This session format is designed to invite K-12 teachers, activists, and other educational stakeholders who have traditionally been absent from CUFA, while also highlighting the cross-pollination of thought and effort that pushes the boundaries of social studies education research and practice. Collaborative initiative session proposal narratives should highlight the collaboration of various stakeholders in our civic climate.

Collaborative initiative session proposals should include the following elements, as appropriate:

  • a) the title;
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form;
  • c) the purposes and objectives of the session;
  • d) theory and research in which the session is grounded;
  • e) methods of presentation or modes of activity for the session;
  • <
  • f) findings or arguments and their warrants; and
  • g) references. Proposals should not exceed 2,000 words, excluding the references and abstract.

Book Session

Book sessions are a new format designed to allow authors of forthcoming books and edited volumes related to social studies education to promote their work. Individuals and groups who have publications in forthcoming books and edited volumes can use these sessions to create a format that best serves their needs and desired audience.

Book session proposals should include the following elements, as appropriate: <

  • a) the title;
  • b) an abstract of 50 words or less that matches the abstract entered on the proposal submission form;
  • c) objectives and recommended audience(s) for the book
  • d) theory and research in which the session is grounded;
  • e) methods of presentation or modes of activity for the session;
  • f) findings or arguments and their warrants; and
  • g) a description that includes whether the book is an edited or single/multiple-authored text and if the book will be available for sale/order by the conference date.

Book session proposals should not exceed 2,000 words.

Reviewers, Chairs, and Discussants

Ensuring an engaging, diverse, and quality CUFA annual conference requires your participation as a reviewer, chair, or discussant. Please sign up to serve as a reviewer, chair, and/or discussant by March 9, 2018. Click the “Sign-Up” link underneath the heading “Review and Program Committee” to enter your personal information, select topics for review, and sign-up to be a chair and/or discussant.

Awards

Individual paper proposals may be self-nominated for two awards: the Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland Social Justice Award and the National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) Fellowship Award. The winners of these awards will be announced at the CUFA business meeting on November 21, 2019 in Austin, Texas.

Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland Social Justice Award

This annual award honors the legacy and memory of Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland. The award recognizes social justice related papers presented at the CUFA annual meeting that make a distinguished and significant contribution to promoting social justice in social education research and teaching. Eligible papers should demonstrate an integrative analysis, and/or make an important theoretical, methodological, or empirical contribution in the field of Social Studies.

Innovative scholarship is encouraged.

The National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) Fellowship Award

This award recognizes an exemplary paper related to technology in social studies education. The award grew out of a collaboration between the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE), the National Technology Leadership Coalition Initiative and CUFA. This annual

SITE/NTLI award recognizes an exemplary technology paper presented at the CUFA conferences. The award recipient(s) are asked to present their paper at the SITE annual conference. The award winning paper is also eligible for publication (following editorial review) in the AACE/CUFA sponsored Journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (www.citejournal.org).

Travel Grants

Support for conference travel and attendance is typically offered by the Scholars of Color Faculty Forum (SoCF), the Small Colleges and Universities Faculty Forum (SCUFF), and the Graduate Forum. Calls for travel grant applications are contingent upon available funding and are issued by each forum several months prior to the conference. These calls will be posted on the unofficial conference website and on social media once they are available.

Social Media

Please use the official conference hashtag #CUFA19 and follow @CUFANCSS on Twitter. The unofficial conference website, https://cufa2019.blogspot.com, has information about the call for proposals, awards, travel grants, and a special section for graduate students. This unofficial conference website will be updated regularly as the conference approaches, and updates will also be posted on the CUFA Facebook page. For general information about CUFA, visit the official website at https://cufa.socialstudies.org/home.

Questions & Inquiries

General information and regular updates regarding CUFA 2019 can be found at the unofficial conference website, https://cufa2019.blogspot.com/. Please direct any questions about the call for proposals, proposal submission process, and reviewer sign-up process to Dr. Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, 2019 CUFA Program Chair, at cufa19conference@gmail.com. Presenters and attendees required to register for the conference at www.socialstudies.org.